INDIAN SUMMER, and the Tranisition between all Seasons: Earth

As we pay attention to the natural rhythms of life, we easily attune and find harmony. Now it is time to turn our awareness to Late Summer / Indian Summer – the Earth Element. This is the interchange of all seasons, the Center. It is the point of transition from yang to yin, between the expansive growth phases of spring and summer, and the inward, cooler, more mysterious fall and winter seasons. This is a pleasant, tranquil, and flourishing season. One may feel as if time stops and activity becomes effortless, dreamlike. Unity, harmony, and the middle way are summoned between the extremes. The interchange between periods (the two equinoxes and two solstices are also buffers between seasons, governed by the Earth Element), represents pivotal pauses in the light patterns we experience from the sun, the center of our solar system.

To attune with late summer, listen and pay attention, to its subtle current. Find the rhythms and cycles that make life simple and harmonious, centered and balanced. Yellow and orange are the colors of the season. Chaotic, rigid, discordant conditions, whether mental or physical, can be transformed through centering practices such as qigong and tai chi.

Foods: Choose foods for each meal that are harmonizing and represent the center – mildly sweet foods, yellow or golden foods, round foods. Select foods known to harmonize the center – millet, corn, carrots, cabbage, garbanzo beans, soybeans, squash, potatoes, string beans, yams, fresh tofu, sweet potatoes, sweet rice, rice, amaranth, peas, chestnuts, filberts, apricots, cantaloupe. Prepare foods simply. Practice moderation as a guide – preparation, cooking time, temperature, methods, use of oils and water.

You may choose this time of interchange to practice a purification – a mild cleansing. Naturally, these practices may be followed at any time of year to support balanced and harmonious experiences.

The Earth Element’s related organs, the spleen-pancreas and stomach, are primarily responsible for digestion and distribution of food and nutrients /life experiences and how they nourish us. The qi energy and other essencesextracted from digestion are used by the body to create wei qi (say ‘way chee’) or immunity, vitality, warmth, and formation of the body’s tissue and mental functions.

In balance, we are able to nurture ourselves and others; feel strong, active, and stable. We have good appetite and digestion, endurance. We feel organized and orderly; attentive; creative with a flourishing sense of imagination.

What you can do: Nurture – yourself, others; allow yourself to be nurtured…spiritually, emotionally, mentally, and physically. Play six healing sounds qigong, standing practices to ground and send deep roots into the earth.

Enjoy Indian Summer. May life be rich, vibrant, harmonious, peaceful, easy, and creative!

September is National Fall Prevention Awareness Month

Exciting things will be happening all month in honor of National Fall Prevention Awareness Day, September 22, 2017

Heather with Dr Paul Lam, TCHI Founder and Dr Richard Carmona, 17th US Surgeon General

September 11-12,  Neurology Symposium,  Territory Neurology Institute.  “How Tai Chi helps spirit, mind, body for balance and well-being”   Hacienda Del Sol.    I will give a brief talk with a group of us leading an interactive demo on Monday 10:30-11:00 AND we have an information table both days, 9 am -3:30pm Monday,  9am-4:15pm Tuesday.  Lunch will be provided – please register at http://territorynri.com/3rd-annual-neuroscience-support-skills-symposium/

Sept 18-20-22  Golder Ranch Fire District, Oro Valley  “Senior Safety Days”.  Demo classes Sept 18 and 20 9-10am, Information and how to get started in Tai Chi for Fall Prevention Sept 22, 9-noon. 1175 W Magee, Station 610

Sept 22, Valley Assistance Services,  Green Valley  “Stay Vertical” Event. Valley Presbyterian Church.  10-1. Lunch will be served.  Tai Chi for Fall Prevention info table all morning,  demo at approximately 11:30.

Sept 22, with Healthy Pima Initiative and Southern Arizona Fall Prevention Coalition, I made an appearance on Morning Blend TV Show.  http://www.kgun9.com/morning-blend/pima-county-programs-proven-to-help-prevent-falls

Sept 22,  Light Up the Night,  Phoenix.   TCHI, Master Trainer Heather Chalon, MPH is an event sponsor.  See Flyer for detailsLight Up the Night-AFPC-Flyer-Final (2)    6:30-7:30, Civic Space Park,  424 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ

Falls are NOT a natural part of the aging process.  Programs such as the evidence based,  Tai chi for Arthritis for Fall Prevention program,  endorsed by the CDC, National council on Aging,  Arthritis Foundation, and more,   help millions of people every day to gain strength, balance, mobility, and friendships.   Locally instructors offer weekly classes designed to be safe, effective, and enjoyable.  Ask Master Trainer, Heather Chalon, MPH how you can participate in classes,  learn how to become a practice leader or instructor,  bring the program to your location.   heather@heatherchalon.com

Many people think falls are a normal part of aging. The truth is, they’re not. Most falls can be prevented—and you have the power to reduce your risk.

Exercising, managing your medications, having your vision checked, and making your living environment safer are all steps you can take to prevent a fall.

Every year on the first day of fall, we celebrate National Falls Prevention Awareness Day to bring attention to this growing public health issue. To promote greater awareness and understanding here are 10 common myths—and the reality—about older adult falls:

Myth 1: Falling happens to other people, not to me.

Reality: Many people think, “It won’t happen to me.” But the truth is that 1 in 4 older adults fall every year in the U.S.

Myth 2: Falling is something normal that happens as you get older.

Reality: Falling is not a normal part of aging. Strength and balance exercises, managing your medications, having your vision checked and making your living environment safer are all steps you can take to prevent a fall.

Myth 3: If I limit my activity, I won’t fall.

Reality: Some people believe that the best way to prevent falls is to stay at home and limit activity. Not true. Performing physical activities will actually help you stay independent, as your strength and range of motion benefit from remaining active. Social activities are also good for your overall health.

Myth 4: As long as I stay at home, I can avoid falling.

Reality: Over half of all falls take place at home. Inspect your home for fall risks. Fix simple but serious hazards such as clutter, throw rugs, and poor lighting. Make simple home modifications, such as adding grab bars in the bathroom, a second handrail on stairs, and non-slip paint on outdoor steps.

Myth 5: Muscle strength and flexibility can’t be regained.

Reality: While we do lose muscle as we age, exercise can partially restore strength and flexibility. It’s never too late to start an exercise program. Even if you’ve been a “couch potato” your whole life, becoming active now will benefit you in many ways—including protection from falls.

Myth 6: Taking medication doesn’t increase my risk of falling.

Reality: Taking any medication may increase your risk of falling. Medications affect people in many different ways and can sometimes make you dizzy or sleepy. Be careful when starting a new medication. Talk to your health care provider about potential side effects or interactions of your medications.

Myth 7: I don’t need to get my vision checked every year.

Reality: Vision is another key risk factor for falls. Aging is associated with some forms of vision loss that increase risk of falling and injury. People with vision problems are more than twice as likely to fall as those without visual impairment. Have your eyes checked at least once a year and update your eyeglasses. For those with low vision there are programs and assistive devices that can help. Ask your optometrist for a referral.

Myth 8: Using a walker or cane will make me more dependent.

Reality: Walking aids are very important in helping many older adults maintain or improve their mobility. However, make sure you use these devices safely. Have a physical therapist fit the walker or cane to you and instruct you in its safe use.

Myth 9: I don’t need to talk to family members or my health care provider if I’m concerned about my risk of falling. I don’t want to alarm them, and I want to keep my independence.

Reality: Fall prevention is a team effort. Bring it up with your doctor, family, and anyone else who is in a position to help. They want to help you maintain your mobility and reduce your risk of falling.

Myth 10: I don’t need to talk to my parent, spouse, or other older adult if I’m concerned about their risk of falling. It will hurt their feelings, and it’s none of my business.

Reality: Let them know about your concerns and offer support to help them maintain the highest degree of independence possible. There are many things you can do, including removing hazards in the home, finding a fall prevention program in the community, or setting up a vision exam.

6-Steps-to-Prevent-a-Fall

Upcoming Tai Chi for Health and Qigong Events

Look for Weekly tai chi classes and other tai chi, qigong, tao yoga events, Details on Calendar

Free Tai Chi for Health at Pima County Libraries – series listing

Tai Chi for Health Skill Builders       Saturdays         Monthly        9-noon pm

Sun Style 73 Forms                             Saturdays          Monthly       1-4pm

Territory Nueorology Symposium September 11 and 12, 2017.  Hacienda Del Sol.   Presentation and demonstration 10:30-11 Sept 11,  How Tai Chi works spirit, mind, body. Info booth both days. (registration required http://territorynri.com/3rd-annual-neuroscience-support-skills-symposium/)

September 16,  Tai chi for Arthritis for Fall Prevention Skill Builder                                9-noon

September 16,  Sun 73 Tai Chi,  intensive.  Section 1.        all levels                                 1-4 pm      

September 18, 20, 22  National Falls Prevention Awareness events.  Oro Valley and Green Valley

September 23      QIGONG:  8 Sections of Brocade                  all levels                    1-4 pm                                                                                        

TCA/FP Workshop, Casper Wyoming              Sat-Sun     August 26-27, 2017            9am-5pm  Register at TCHI.org

TCA/FP Workshop,  Tucson AZ                           Sat-Sun      Sept 30-Oct 1                        9am-5pm Register at  tchi.org

TCA/FP Workshop, Phoenix AZ                      October -TBD, 2017               9am-5pm  Please email Heather if you are interested in taking the 2-day training in Phoenix, we are working on dates for September, October, 2017.

TCA/FP Workshop, Havasu City, AZ                October 26-27, 2017                                  9am-5pm                Register at tchi.org